unamusedsloth:

Glitches in the matrix.

(via eatmeallnight)

yourstyle-men:

Style For Men on Tumblr 👔www.yourstyle-men.tumblr.com
VKONTAKTE -//- FACEBOOK -//- INSTAGRAM

Steven Yeun poses for a portrait in the Portrait Studio at Comic-Con International 2014 at Hard Rock Hotel on July 26, 2014 in San Diego, California.

(Source: stilinskis, via muslimrave)

vinebox:

When you go over your Budget while grocery shopping

(via myfriendcynthia)

nedahoyin:

httpgangstaaa:

mango-emoji:

squad

.


I died the first time and every time thereafter..

nedahoyin:

httpgangstaaa:

mango-emoji:

squad

.

I died the first time and every time thereafter..

(Source: rebirthofthe90s)

-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

(via from-a-naija-perspective)

gumasaat:

taupe and cream yellow
good pairing

gumasaat:

taupe and cream yellow

good pairing

(via akilivumbi)

amodernmanifesto:

The introduction to Gerald Horne’s The Counter-Revolution of 1776: Slave Resistance and the Origins of the United States of America.

It was just past ten in the morning on 22 June 1772 in a London courtroom. And the presiding magistrate, Lord Mansfield, had just made a ruling that suggested that slavery, the blight that had ensnared so many, would no longer obtain, at least not in England. A few nights later, a boisterous group of Africans, numbering in the hundreds, gathered for a festive celebration; strikingly, none defined as “white” were allowed— though they toasted Lord Mansfield, the first Scot to become a powerful lawyer, legislator, politician, and judge, with unbounded enthusiasm.1

Others were not so elated, particularly in Virginia, where the former “property” in question in this case had been residing. “Is it in the Power of Parliament to make such a Law? Can any human law abrogate the divine? The Law[s] of Nature are the Laws of God,” wrote one querulously questioning writer.2 Indicating that this was not a sectional response, a correspondent in Manhattan near the same time assured that this ostensibly anti-slavery ruling “will occasion a greater ferment in America (particularly in the islands) than the Stamp Act itself,” a reference to another London edict that was then stirring controversy in the colonies.3 The radical South Carolinian William Drayton—whose colony barely contained an unruly African majority—was apoplectic about this London decision, asserting that it would “complete the ruin of many American provinces.”4

devoutfashion:

GREY, Nigerian Clothing Brand

(via myfriendcynthia)